Bangkok, Thailand: CloudFlare’s 79th Data Center

Published on by Nitin Rao.

CloudFlare just turned up our newest data center in Bangkok, the capital of Thailand and a very popular destination with travelers in Southeast Asia. This expands our network to span 32 cities across Asia, and 79 cities globally. The floating market at Damnoen Saduak, just outside Bangkok (Photo source: CloudFlare's very own Martin Levy) Thailand, with a population of 65 million, is the fourth largest country in Southeast…

Lizard Squad Ransom Threats: New Name, Same Faux Armada Collective M.O.

Published on by Justin Paine.

CloudFlare recently wrote about the group of cyber criminals claiming to be be the "Armada Collective." In that article, we stressed that this group had not followed through on any of the ransom threats they had made. Quite simply, this copycat group of cyber criminals had not actually carried out a single DDoS attack—they were only trying to make easy money through fear by using the name…

Announcing Support for HTTP/2 Server Push

Published on by Vlad Krasnov.

Last November, we rolled out HTTP/2 support for all our customers. At the time, HTTP/2 was not in wide use, but more than 88k of the Alexa 2 million websites are now HTTP/2-enabled. Today, more than 70% of sites that use HTTP/2 are served via CloudFlare. CC BY 2.0 image by Roger Price Incremental Improvements On SPDY HTTP/2’s main benefit…

Ask Me Anything About HTTP/2

Published on by John Roberts.

We're big fans of HTTP/2 at CloudFlare. Our customers make up the majority of HTTP/2 enabled domains today. HTTP/2 is a key part of the modern web, and its growth and adoption is changing how websites and applications are built. On Thursday April 28, 2016, our friends at CatchPoint are hosting a live AMA (Ask Me Anything) with experts from CloudFlare, Akamai, and Google answering…

Building the simplest Go static analysis tool

Published on by Filippo Valsorda.

Go native vendoring (a.k.a. GO15VENDOREXPERIMENT) allows you to freeze dependencies by putting them in a vendor folder in your project. The compiler will then look there before searching the GOPATH. The only annoyance compared to using a per-project GOPATH, which is what we used to do, is that you might forget to vendor a package that you have in your GOPATH. The program will build for…