Tools for debugging, testing and using HTTP/2

Published on by John Graham-Cumming.

With CloudFlare's release of HTTP/2 for all our customers the web suddenly has a lot of HTTP/2 connections. To get the most out of HTTP/2 you'll want to be using an up to date web browser (all the major browsers support HTTP/2). But there are some non-browser tools that come in handy when working with HTTP/2. This blog post starts with a useful…

HTTP/2 is here! Goodbye SPDY? Not quite yet

Published on by Christian Elsen.

Why choose, if you can have both? Today CloudFlare is introducing HTTP/2 support for all customers using SSL/TLS connections, while still supporting SPDY. There is no need to make a decision between SPDY or HTTP/2. Both are automatically there for you and your customers. Enabling HTTP/2 If you are a customer on the Free or Pro plan, there is no need to do anything…

Zürich, Switzerland: CloudFlare's 69th Data Center

Published on by Joshua Motta.

Grüetzi Zürich, our 5th point of presence (PoP) to be announced this week, and 69th globally! Located at the northern tip of Lake Zürich in Switzerland, the city of Zürich, often referred to as "Downtown Switzerland," is the largest city in the country. Following this expansion, traffic from Switzerland's seven million internet users to sites and apps using CloudFlare is now mere milliseconds away. Although best…

CloudFlare launches India data centers in Mumbai, Chennai and New Delhi

Published on by Nitin Rao.

India is home to 400 million Internet users, second only to China, and will add more new users this year than any other country in the world. CloudFlare protects and accelerates 4 million websites, mobile apps and APIs, and is trusted by over 10,000 new customers each day. Combine these forces, and we are positioned to connect hundreds of millions of Indian users with the millions of…

The story of one latency spike

Published on by Marek Majkowski.

A customer reported an unusual problem with our CloudFlare CDN: our servers were responding to some HTTP requests slowly. Extremely slowly. 30 seconds slowly. This happened very rarely and wasn't easily reproducible. To make things worse all our usual monitoring hadn't caught the problem. At the application layer everything was fine: our NGINX servers were not reporting any long running requests. Time to send in The Wolf. He…