Cloudflare Crypto Meetup #5: February 28, 2017

by Nick Sullivan.

Come join us on Cloudflare HQ in San Francisco on Tuesday, Febrary 28, 2017 for another cryptography meetup. We again had a great time at the last one, we decided to host another. It's becoming a pattern.

We’ll start the evening at 6:00p.m. with time for networking, followed up with short talks by leading experts starting at 6:30p.m. Pizza and beer are provided! RSVP here.

Here are the confirmed speakers:

Deirdre Connolly

Deirdre is a senior software engineer at Brightcove, where she is trying to secure old and new web applications. Her interests include applied cryptography, secure defaults, elliptic curves and their isogenies.

Post-quantum cryptography

Post-quantum cryptography is an active field of research in developing new cryptosystems that will be resistant to attack by future quantum computers. Recently a somewhat obscure area, isogeny-based cryptography, has been getting more attention, including impressive speed and compression optimizations and robust security analyses, bringing it into regular discussion alongside other post-quantum candidates. This talk will cover isogeny-based crypto, specifically these recents results regarding supersingular isogeny diffie-hellman, which is a possible replacement for the ephemeral key exchanges in use today.

Maya Kaczorowski

Maya Kaczorowski is a Product Manager at Google in Security & Privacy. Her work focuses on encryption at rest and encryption key management.

How data at rest is encrypted in Google's Cloud, at scale

How does Google encrypt data at rest? This talk will cover how Google shards and encrypts data by default, Google's key management system, root of trust, and Google's cryptographic library. Google Cloud Platform encrypts customer content stored at rest, without any action from the customer, using one or more encryption mechanisms. We will also discuss best practices in implementing encryption for your storage system(s).

Andrew Ayer

Andrew Ayer is a security researcher interested in the Web's Public Key Infrastructure. He is the founder of SSLMate, an automated SSL certificate service, and the author of Cert Spotter, an open source Certificate Transparency monitor. Andrew participates in the IETF's Public Notary Transparency working group and recently used Certificate Transparency logs to uncover over 100 improperly-issued Symantec certificates.

Certificate Transparency

Certificate Transparency improves the security of the Web PKI by logging every publicly-trusted SSL certificate to public, verifiable, append-only logs, which domain owners can monitor to detect improperly-issued certificates for their domains. Certificate Transparency was created by Google and is now being standardized by the IETF. Beginning October 2017, Chrome will require all new certificates be logged with Certificate Transparency.

This talk will explore how Certificate Transparency works, how domain owners can take advantage of it, and what the future holds for Certificate Transparency.

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