Moving beyond the DC Circuit Court Decision on the FCC’s Open Internet Order

Published on by Kenneth R. Carter.

CloudFlare is a strong supporter of a free and open Internet. We believe in both fair and free markets and effective regulation to achieve that goal. That is why we read the recent United States Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit’s opinion in Verizon v. FCC with great interest, curious to understand how the decision might affect the dynamic and innovative qualities of the Internet.…

A Day in the Life of a Technical Support Engineer at CloudFlare - Marty Strong, London

Published on by Marty Strong.

This blog post is the first in a series from the CloudFlare support team. Over the next few months, engineers from our support team will write posts about working with customers and with other members of the CloudFlare team. As a Technical Support Engineer I get to work with many different members of the CloudFlare family and with customers from all around the world. Each day is very…

Understanding and mitigating NTP-based DDoS attacks

Published on by John Graham-Cumming.

Over the last couple of weeks you may have been hearing about a new tool in the DDoS arsenal: NTP-based attacks. These have become popular recently and caused trouble for some gaming web sites and service providers. We'd long thought that NTP might become a vector for DDoS attacks because, like DNS, it is a simple UDP-based protocol that can be persuaded to return a large…

Bienvenido a Chile: CloudFlare's 24th Data Center Now Live!

Published on by Joshua Motta.

Cue up the fuegos artificiales again! Our data center in Valparaiso, Chile marks the 24th in our global network, our second south of the equator and the first in Latin America. Until now, all traffic to the CloudFlare network from the the over 600 million inhabitants in Latin America has largely been routed through our data center in Miami. If you’re in Chile or Argentina, that…

How the NSA (may have) put a backdoor in RSA’s cryptography: A technical primer

Published on by Nick Sullivan.

There has been a lot of news lately about nefarious-sounding backdoors being inserted into cryptographic standards and toolkits. One algorithm, a pseudo-random bit generator, Dual_EC_DRBG, was ratified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 2007 and is attracting a lot of attention for having a potential backdoor. This is the algorithm into which the NSA allegedly inserted a backdoor and then paid RSA…